A Bonny Bread Featured with Irish Calligraphy Work

March 11, 2014  •  Leave a Comment

IRISH SODA BREAD

This is a recipe I enjoy preparing, especially in March and around St. Patrick's Day. Why?
It's E.A.S.Y. It's Ina Garten's yummy recipe. Click here for her recipe link and here to watch her short video.

 

There is no kneading or rising.

Simply mix, bake, enjoy.

baked.cooled.loafbaked.cooled.loaf

INGREDIENTS:

4 cups all-purpose flour, plus extra for currents
1/4 cup sugar
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) cold unsalted butter, diced in 1/2 inch pieces
1 3/4 cups buttermilk
1 extra-large egg, lightly beaten
1 teaspoon grated orange zest
1 cup dried currants

DIRECTIONS:

1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Line a sheet pan with parchment paper.
2. Combine dry ingredients - flour, sugar, baking soda, salt - in mixer bowl fitted with the paddle attachment.

add sugaradd sugar
3. Add the diced butter and mix on low speed until butter is mixed into the flour.

cube buttercube butter
4. Combine wet ingredients in measuring cup - the buttermilk, egg and orange zest. Mix with a fork - enough to break up the egg, then, with mixer on low speed, gradually add buttermilk mixture to the flour mixture.

grated orange.egg.buttermilkgrated orange.egg.buttermilk
5. Combine the currants with 1 tablespoon of flour and mix into the dough. It will be very wet. Be careful not to over mix.

blend wet and dryblend wet and dry

add currentsadd currents

6. Put dough onto a well-floured board or silicone surface. Roll or knead enough to shape it into a round loaf. Place the loaf on prepared parchment paper on baking sheet. Cut an X into the top of the bread with a serrated knife.

rounded loafrounded loaf
7. Bake for 45 to 55 minutes, or until cake tester comes out clean and when you tap the loaf, it has a hollow sound.

8. Cool on baking rack. Serve warm, at room temperature or toasted.

baked.cooled.loafbaked.cooled.loaf

Enjoy this tasty bread with your breakfast, lunch or dinner!

Also, visit my Penscriptions Calligraphy Cultural Connections Gallery and enjoy 10% off Irish items
(St Patrick's Breastplate, Be Thou My Vision, Faed Fiada, Beatus)

LIMITED TIME - only 4 days - from today, March 11, 2014 through March 14, 2014.

Use coupon code MENSBC at checkout.

Be Thou My VisionBe Thou My VisionTitle: Be Thou My Vision
Original: 13 x 9 inches, watercolor on Roma paper

The initials beginning each paragraph have small design elements inspired by the Lindesfarne Gospels.

The text, part of Irish monastic tradition since 700 CE., is an example of a Lorica, an incantation recited for protection in arming oneself for spiritual or physical battle. It has has become a popular song performed by contemporary Christian musicians. The tune is the Irish folk song, Slane, about Slane Hill where in 433 AD, St Patrick defied the pagan High King Loegaire of Tara by lighting candles on Easter Eve. Aside from this connection to Christianity, the folk song had little prior connection to the text.

Translated from ancient Irish to English by Mary E. Byrne in 1905.

BeatusBeatusTitle: Beatus
Original: 1992, 6 x 9 inches, watercolor on Diploma Parchment


Beatus or Blessing … In 1992 I was privileged to take a class on traditional illumination from Donald Jackson. We referred to the illuminated initial ‘B’ in his book, The Story of Writing, to produce our illuminated piece. His original source was the Worms Bible, from the Rhine area of Germany about 1148.

The steps in making an illuminated letter are: 1. trace image 2. sketch outline with pen and ink 3. lay gesso (the base for the gold to adhere) 4. apply gold leaf 5. apply the palest colors 6. apply the middle tones 7. add a final layer of each color 8. outline with black 9. highlight with fine white lines applied with pen or brush.

It was Donald’s dream to one day letter the Bible; this has become reality for him, as he is the artistic director of the St. John’s Bible, the first hand-written Bible in 500 years.It was Donald’s dream to one day letter the Bible; this has become reality for him, as he is the artistic director of the St. John’s Bible, the first hand-written Bible in 500 years.

Faed Fiada • The Deer's CryFaed Fiada • The Deer's CryTitle: Faed Fiada
Original: 11 x 15 inches with watercolor on Arches cold press


Faed Fiada, which means The Deer’s Cry, is a portion of a longer text by St Patrick.

A Celtic style with Uncial letter forms and Celtic style knot work was designed for this piece.

Prayer was at the center of St. Patrick's life. Prayer was also his sword and shield, particularly at time of crisis. Here he calls on the Trinity to protect him against danger and to weaken the power of his enemy.

Will close this missive with a couple Irish thoughts ::

May your heart be warm and happy,
With the lilt of Irish laughter,
Every day in every way
and forever and ever after.

and ...

Bless you and yours
As well as the cottage you live in.
May the roof overhead be well thatched
And those inside be well matched.

Judy Dodds
PENSCRIPTIONS
Making thoughts visible - calligraphy of hope and inspiration

 

 


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